Root Canal Surgery (Apicoectomy)

It is our goal to keep your mouth healthy, your teeth fully functional, and your smile bright — and we are proud of all the services we offer to do exactly that. At the same time, we want you to understand all that modern dentistry in general has to offer you. To that end, we have assembled a first-rate dental library in which you can find a wealth of information on various dental topics, including:

Cosmetic and General Dentistry

Cosmetic & General Dentistry

From a thorough professional cleaning to a full smile makeover, there is an amazing array of services that cosmetic and general dentists offer to make sure your teeth stay healthy, function well and look great. If your smile is not all you want it to be, this is the place to start. Read more about Cosmetic & General Dentistry.

Emergency Dental Care

Emergency Dental Care

When you have a dental emergency — whether it's caused by a sudden accident or chronic disease — your teeth and/or the tissues of the mouth that surround them need to receive proper care right away. It's also important to be aware, before you're actually in the situation, of what you can do to ensure the best outcome. Read more about Emergency Dental Care.

Endodontics

Endodontics

This is the branch of dentistry that focuses on the inside of the tooth — specifically the root canals and sensitive, inner pulp (nerve) tissue. When this tissue becomes inflamed or infected, a root canal procedure may become necessary. But contrary to the popular myth, a root canal doesn't cause pain, it relives it. Read more about Endodontics.

Implant Dentistry

Implant Dentistry

If you are missing one or more teeth, dental implants offer the comfort and security of a permanent replacement that looks and functions just like your natural teeth. Dental implants also help preserve the tooth-supporting bone in your jaw that naturally deteriorates when even one tooth is lost. Read more about Implant Dentistry.

Oral Health

Oral Health

Oral health is an essential component of general health and well-being. Good oral health means a mouth that's free of disease; a bite that functions well enough for you to eat without pain and get ample nutrition; and a smile that lets you express your happiest emotions with confidence. Read more about Oral Health.

Oral Hygiene

Oral Hygiene

A major goal of modern dentistry is to help you keep your teeth and gums healthy for a lifetime. By following a conscientious program of oral hygiene at home, and coming to the dental office for routine cleanings and exams, you have the best chance of making this goal a reality. Read more about Oral Hygiene.

Oral Surgery

Oral Surgery

The word “surgery” often brings to mind a stay in the hospital, general anesthesia, and perhaps a lengthy recovery period. However, the experience of having oral surgery is usually very different from that. Some common oral surgery procedures include: tooth extractions, dental implant placement, and biopsies of suspicious oral lesions. Read more about Oral Surgery.

Orthodontics

Orthodontics

Adults and kids alike can benefit from the boost in self-confidence that comes from having a great-looking smile with beautifully aligned teeth. Orthodontic treatment can even improve chewing, speaking and oral hygiene in certain cases. And with today's virtually invisible orthodontic appliances, it's possible to keep your treatment a private matter… until your new smile is unveiled, of course! Read more about Orthodontics.

Pediatric Dentistry

Pediatric Dentistry

It's never too early to get your child started on the path toward a lifetime of good oral health, and there are many services to do exactly that. Monitoring your child's dental growth and development, and preventing and intercepting dental diseases along the way, is the primary focus of pediatric dentistry. Read more about Pediatric Dentistry.

Periodontal Therapy

Periodontal Therapy

If you want to keep your teeth for life — a completely reasonable goal in this day and age — you need to make sure the tissues that surround them are also healthy. Should gum problems arise, you may need periodontal therapy to restore diseased tissues to health. Read more about Periodontal Therapy.

Technology

Technology

In the field of dentistry, new technology is constantly changing the way diseases are diagnosed, routine procedures are performed, and illnesses are prevented. Although they may seem unfamiliar at first, new and improved dental technologies offer plenty of real benefits for patients. Read more about Technology.

Occasionally, root canal treatment proves unsuccessful at resolving an infection in the tissues near a tooth's roots. That's when a minor surgical procedure called an apicoectomy may be recommended. Because this procedure is often performed with the aid of a microscope and other small specialized tools, it's considered a type of endodontic microsurgery. Probably the most common type of root canal surgery, an apicoectomy involves removing a small portion of the apex (tip) of the tooth's root, along with any surrounding hard or soft tissue that may be infected.

What would cause you to need an apicoectomy? There could be several reasons, including a canal that is blocked or inaccessible, an anatomical irregularity, or a fracture or crack in the tooth's roots. The procedure is normally only recommended after one or more root canal treatments have been attempted, and have failed. Since this type of problem generally occurs near the apex of the root, the procedure is often an effective way to treat a persistent infection.

Root canal surgery apicoectomy.Before an apicoectomy procedure, diagnostic images (such as X-rays) of the affected tooth and surrounding bone, a careful review of your medical history including medications you take (both prescription and non-prescription), and other factors are reviewed. If an apicoectomy is recommended, the reasons for it will be explained to you.

The Apicoectomy Procedure

Root canal surgery is usually performed under local anesthesia such as a numbing shot, so you won't feel any pain. To begin the procedure, a small incision is made in the gum, and the infection at the end of the tooth's roots is exposed. The infected tissue is then removed, along with a few millimeters of the root tip itself. A dye may be used to help make cracks or fractures easy to see; if we discover that the tooth is fractured, it may be better to extract (remove) it at this time instead of completing the apicoectomy.

Next, a microscope and light are used to examine the tiny canals. They will be cleaned with an ultrasonic instrument, then filled with an inert material and sealed up with a small filling. To finish the procedure, a small bone graft may be placed at the affected site, and then the gum tissue covering the tooth's root will be sutured (sewn) closed. X-rays may also be taken as the procedure nears completion. Afterwards, instructions on postoperative care will be given, and you'll go home. Most apicoectomies take about 30 to 90 minutes to complete.

Following the procedure, you may experience some swelling and soreness in the area that was treated. Over-the-counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen) are usually all that's needed to control any discomfort. You can probably return to normal activities the following day, but you may want to avoid eating hard or crunchy foods or brushing vigorously for a few days afterwards. If your sutures aren't self-dissolving, you will be asked to return in about a week to have them removed.

The Goal: Saving Your Tooth

Although apicoectomy is typically a safe and effective procedure, there are slight risks with any type of minor surgery. That's why apicoectomies are not recommended unless further root canal treatment won't be effective. An alternative treatment in most cases would be extraction of the tooth. However, our goal as dentists is to help you preserve your natural teeth for as long as possible.

While there are excellent methods of tooth replacement (such as dental implants), these involve further and more complex treatments, and they can be costly. An apicoectomy is generally a permanent and cost-effective solution which can help the tooth last for the rest of your life.

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